Category Archives: Trivia

TGIF! Here’s Some Trivia!

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Sometimes all you need is a splash of colors because
the purest and most thoughtful minds are those which love color the most ❤

 

Andhra Pradesh’s ‘Tholu Bommalata‘ based handmade colorful lampshades.

 

  • These colorful lamps are made mainly on goat leather using colorful vegetable dyes.
  • The craft of making these lamp shades is related to a very old but fast disappearing traditional folk form of leather puppetry known as Tholu Bommalata
  • The form originated way back in 200 BC under the Satvahana dynasty
  • The social group engaged in this craft is the Marathi Balija (originally from the Marathwada region)
  • Puppet making was a flourishing business, especially when puppetry was one of the main forms of entertainment in villages.
  • With the decline of shadow puppet theatre, leather puppet makers are being forced into making items such as colorful lampshades or even toys using their art.
  • Lampshades are made with the help of a mould. The leather (two halves) is wrapped around it and stitched together. The artisan makes designs on it, using a pencil. The designs are mainly mythological figures and sometimes his/her own creations. Once done the outlines are painted with black. Vibrant colors are filled in with vegetables dyes. Small holes are chiseled in the patterns using a pogaru (chisel) which enhance the attractiveness of the lamp.

 

….and, if you like what you see & read, do ‘like it’ & ‘share it’. Non WordPress users please ‘rate’ it to express your appreciation 🙂 Also do not forget to ‘follow the blog’ to remain updated about newer posts ❤ 

 

HAPPY  TRAVELLING!
Monika Ohson / TravelerInMe

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TGIF! Here’s Some Trivia!

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The Persian Hammam or Royal Baths

 

Traditional floral fresco paintings on the ceiling of Hammam-i-Shahi

The earliest evidence of bathroom is from the Indus Valley (Harappa & Mohenjo-daro) Civilization ~6000+ years ago.  In Iranian culture Persian bath or hammam or bathhouse existed prior to the Islamic period. However, their number were limited due to the Zoroastrian religion’s reverence for the holy element of water. But in the medieval times, with the conversion of the population of Iran to Islam, bathhouses grew in numbers.

The Indo Persian hammam in Bharatpur Fort-Palace, Rajasthan, India

During that time the influence was visible in the royal bath’s of India too since we did have Turks-Mughals rulers. Even the Rajput & Jat rulers built similar baths in Indo (Rajput)- Persian style in their palaces. The ceilings & walls of the hammam’s are beautifully decorated with traditional fresco paintings (flowers, creepers)

This beautiful Hammam-i-Shahi (quite like a modern spa) was built by Maharaja Jawahar Singh in Indo-Persion architectural style (mid 18th century). The royal bath has two sections: one being the highly decorative inner section with lots of jaali window for flow of natural light and air circulation. The hammam has the provision of mixing hot and cold water too.

The highly decorative inner section of the hammam

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Bathhouses grew in numbers in the medieval times

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Another ceiling fresco pattern

 

 

….and, if you like what you see & read, do ‘like it’ & ‘share it’. Non WordPress users please ‘rate’ it to express your appreciation 🙂 Also do not forget to ‘follow the blog’ to remain updated about newer posts ❤ 

 

HAPPY  TRAVELLING!
Monika Ohson / TravelerInMe

 

 

 

TGIF! Here’s Some Trivia!

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ਸਰੀ ਹਰਿ ਕਿਸ਼ਨ ਧਿਆਈਝ ਜਿਸ ਡਿਠੇ ਸਭਿ ਦਖਿ ਜਾਇ॥

sree har kishan dhhiaaeeai jis ddit(h)ae sabh dhukh jaae
(And then I reflect on) the most venerable Guru Har Krishan, seeing whom all the sufferings melt away

From Guru Gobind Singh ji ‘s Chandi Di Vaar which we read everyday in Ardas*

Night view of sarovar, Gurudwara Bangla Sahib, New Delhi, India

 

Way back in 1664, before the Gurudwara, there was a bungalow ‘Jaisinghpura Palace’ at this very spot that belonged to Mirza Raja Jai Singh. The word ‘Bangla Sahib’ is derived from bungalow /bangla.

When 7 years old Guru Har Krishan ji (8th Sikh guru) came to Delhi, he stayed in this very bungalow as Raja’s guest. That time there was an epidemic of small pox in Delhi. Numerous devotees came in everyday to see the little Guru. Guru Har Krishan ji helped the suffering by offering aid and fresh water from the well at this bungalow. He healed thousands with his miraculous touch. It is said that the Guru ultimately took the illness upon himself and died in this very bungalow.

In the year 1783 Sardar Bhagel Singh, a Sikh military general, established as many as nine gurudwaras in Delhi including Bangla Sahib.

The well from where Guru Har Krishan ji offered water to his devotees is now the ‘sarovar‘ (holy pond). Its water is revered for its healing properties and is taken home by devotees from across the globe. The Sikhs regard it as holy water or ‘Amrit‘.

 

*prayer or benti to the Lord

 

….and, if you like what you see & read, do ‘like it’ & ‘share it’. Non WordPress users please ‘rate’ it to express your appreciation 🙂 Also do not forget to ‘follow the blog’ to remain updated about newer posts ❤ 

 

HAPPY  TRAVELLING!
Monika Ohson / TravelerInMe